Rushing decreases skill, even behind the wheel

In almost anything that you do, rushing is going to decrease the amount of skill that you put into that task.

Take painting a room in your house. You can go slowly, tape all of the trim, switch brushes to have the right one for each step in the job, and get a great result. Or you can skip the taping, rush through the job with a roller and an oversized brush, and get done faster — but with sloppy edges and paint on your trim.

The same basic principle applies to driving. If you’re rushing while you drive, you’re more likely to miss warning signs, run stops signs and red lights, dangerously tailgate other drivers and make a whole host of other mistakes. Those who slow down and drive carefully are best prepared and can therefore often avoid accidents.

Experts note that rushing and speeding won’t even really save you time. That’s especially true for short trips. Driving dangerously and pushing your car to 20 miles per hour over the limit may only save you three or four minutes on the way to work. Does that really make a difference? Is it worth massively increasing your odds of an accident just to save yourself three minutes? If you think it is, you’ll feel far differently after you get in,to an accident.

Well, say you’ve now decided to never rush or speed while driving. That’s great, but remember that other drivers are still going to do both. If you are injured in an accident one of them causes, you may need to seek compensation.

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